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at spur. it is my distinct pleasure to welcome such an amazing panel as well as the mayor of our fine city. this is the innovation mayor, mayor ed lee. [applause] >> thank you. can everyone here me? welcome to spur. i enjoy being here because every time i come here, some part of my brain wakes up that has not been woken up before. i am here to welcome you. earlier, i had a wonderful opportunity to exchange with our panel members about what they are doing and how they're doing it. . i think these panel members are here as part of their own entrepreneurial spirit. they own companies but love the city. they know the spirit of the city is one of innovation, that invites peoples and views, and smashes them -- meshes them together to see if we can make an even better san francisco. we have two other supervisors who may be coming later. we're all part of the initial group of policymakers at city hall who want to hear news views and ideas on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in it because it has aspects that have piqued our interest, about hoour environment, how to improve life for m
is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a building. that building is going to hold our operations center and our emergency operations center for things like earth quack. that building had to be immediately occupiable. great. but we can do better than that. so, this new technology that we ended up using was a concrete building that straps basically, that goes through the interior of the building and allow the building to turn or twist as part of an earthquake as it corrects itself. >> in the course for the puc buildi
often. we announced that the entire city family take time to think about whether the existing laws should apply to the new activity or whether we should create new policies and regulations that apply more appropriately to the activity. we look forward to tackling that with the working group going forward. >> how was the turnout? >> it was a pretty huge turnout. we had about 40 hosts from san francisco, probably more than that. many of them testified. it was an incredibly moving experience. i do not think i have seen a city hearing the was that emotional. people are using this income to pay property taxes if they own their home, pay off their mortgages, pay increasing rents. our cofounders could not afford their increasing rent so they blew up an air mattress in their living room and rented it out to make rent. this is incredibly important as a source of income for our hosts. if you are taxing at 15%, we need to do so thoughtfully. >> what was the treasurer's view? how is it different from yours? >> we do not know what the treasurer's view is. we would love to discuss this collabora
in san francisco that the city does not have regulations as far as licenses and certification is required for tour guides. it is already very open. it is different from the regulations in new york city. that is another market we're in. we're looking forward to allowing san francisco to lead the way by showing the impact our platform can have. we are also really concerned with the tax issue as well. so far, the tax code is really segmented largely for personal and business taxes. the sharing economy presents a nuanced situation. individuals are not businesses but are enjoying a new stream of income. we are interested in having that conversation in a way where we can use the new economy to benefit the city as well as individuals who are proactively taking all entrepreneurship in their own hands to leverage their own resources and knowledge to supplement their income. >> at task rabbit, we're looking to partner with the city and generate more awareness around what we do and how consumers and small businesses can get involved. we have a lot of small businesses utilizing the network as a deliv
could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating com
issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o assistance with our many business partners. this is a core part of mfac original purpose in san francisco. we are focused on building this capacity once again. as everyone here knows, the nature of how cities are doing business is changing. fundamentally. costly federal and state mandates continue to squeeze local budgets. increasing costs are forcing discussions about how we provide services. technology is requiring that we move more quickly than we have in a long time. building a network of partners to support our city government at this time will be more important than ever and will be critical as we were to e
francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of truste
another names as they serve our great city and become our great local heroes. many of these names now on this very wonderful interactive board. tonight celebrate. celebrate the whole month and make sure we remember our heroes and make sure we honor the current ones that are serving today. and let's get the filipino-american candidates rally going for more heros in san francisco! celebrate filipino-american history month. thank you everybody for being here tonight. [ applause ] here to introduce the mayor of san francisco, forecast sf sponsor and regional vice president health system innovation and community benefit for california pacific medical center, please welcome judy lee. judy. (applause). >> good morning. i've learned a lot this morning nr tim and john and i think the most personally relevant to me is john's comments about the mortgage rate hitting the all-time low. so i think i'm going to have it call my husband and take that refi offer during the break. but back to the agenda. since becoming mayor, at lee has prioritized job grow *t and making san francisco the innovation
] i would love to hear from each one of you with the city could do in terms of regulation to help your businesses. we talked about the tax issue. what with each of you say is an issue the city could help with. >> i will start. one thing we would like to see is to make parking easier. we want it to be as easy to share your car as possible, and if you when your car and the renter cannot find a parking spot, that is an issue we need to solve. there are actually great models from around the world in terms of on street parking or some sort of system to not only encourage car owners to share, but also not discourage people from using private car sharing because parking is an issue. we have been piloting this a little bit, and we hope to actually see something come out around parking. obviously, the other issues we have discussed impact any of the schering economy companies. you could also see opportunities to educate the public or just gain awareness for the services through the city and existing programs. >> i forgot to repeat the question, but the question is -- what regulations to the com
the truth about $55 million in tax revenue. nightlife is the only significant industry in this city that sometimes gets treated at times as it is a nuisance, a problem to be managed. and of course, we have to focus on making sure it is safe and that people are complying with the laws and that we are not having shooting. but when you get so focused on combating the negatives -- every industry has the negatives. you can sometimes lose sight of the positives and we know there are a huge positives for nightlife in the city. we know that a lot of our street shares are at risk -- street fairs are at risk of being given fees to death. we have completely outdated the planning commission like that mission how are used district, which makes it extremely hard to do anything alcohol related in a big swath of the mission. there was a bowling alley that wanted to go in at 17th and van ness and they were not going to be able to do it because they would have been banned from even selling beer. that is the tip of the iceberg in terms of planning provisions that make it hard to foster a knife in the
there is a vacancy. the board may overrule the action of a department action. to my left is city attorney robert brian. he will provide the board with any needed legal advice this evening. at the board is christopher pacheco. we are joined by representatives by some of the departments that have cases before the board . scott sanchez is here and representing the planning department and ethics -- >> >> planning commission and we have ed ris kin here and christine who is the director of the municipal services and taxis and have an officer from the san francisco police department permit bureau. if you could go over the guidelines and conduct the swearing in progress. >> the board requests that you turn off all phones and proceedings. please have conversations in the hallways. the rules are as follows representatives each have seven minutes to present their cases and three minutes for rebuttals. parties affiliated within these matters must be complete within that time and members of the public have three minutes to address the board but no rebuttals. to assist the board members who wish to speak
. if you're looking for a park or if you're not familiar with any of the parks here in the city are, this app is a perfect accessory. so we're basically zooming in on the map right now. you can see the clustering 2 12 parks. as you get closer in, it lets you know where you're at. i'll zoom in on a park. you can see many different parks here. if you go to dolores, we'll start to see all of the facilities that they have available. looks like there's a tennis court, a dog play area, some children's park play areas. and if you actually go into one of the children's play area maybe, you can see some details about it. any news about each of the parks is going to be referenced here through a feed. ability to donate to the rec and park. let's say a ballfield, you'd be getting ballfield information. if there's close out based on rain. and you can do some filtering, spot-check the filtering real quick. this is what's near right now. filter, we've got, i don't know, what is it, over 10 categories, maybe closer to 20. and basically anything you're looking for, you can turn on right here. for me
compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually talking about it because the demand side, as we were talking about it, will be there because there is going to be someone there. there have to be people working with it who are getting out there. i think this is what this city is going to be really powerful. in terms of other cities doing as well, chicago is doing some really interesting stuff. scary cool stuff. they're taking 3 in 1 data, pothole request and crime report and matching it up with social media. they're getting this really deep and rich picture of wha
, as an attorney (inaudible). of course, i litigated against the city for some years and got convinced that maybe that does not end up in all of the best results. so i got enticed by (inaudible) to start working in it and... required the people in the city government who wanted to do better but simply did not know how. the passion was there. the passion from our communities have been there for many, many years. and so, fast forward 20 years later i am the mayor of this crazy place and i tried... (inaudible). and i think the great way of doing that is to model new ways to an old passion and as people who want to solve problems and people who have passion to get other people involved in the community and government and people who have a passion to help others. people who have the passion to pledge the welfare of the city ahead of their own success. that is what i want to see happen in government. and so, a lot of it is called innovations because, guess what? i learned very quickly, from years of working with christene and others, innovation is not just about technology, it is about a spirit of bein
in san francisco because san francisco is one of the most innovative cities in the galaxy, and it's a very great place to be the home of the challenge america summit, the first-ever challenge america summit. so it's now my job to introduce our first speaker of the night, who is going to officially kick off the first-ever challenge america summit, somebody who has been verylfe instrumental in creating a movement around innovation in san francisco. just a few months ago, announced october as innovation month inla whole lot of work on, you know, creating a@g real ecosystem for entrepreneurs, for governments, for everybody to create new ideas and new innovations. please join me in welcoming mayor ed lee to the floor. >> [applause.] >> thank you. thank you, josh. welcome, everybody. now that i know where i'm at, i want to welcome all of you, i want to of course thank the night challenge -- night rover challenge, nasa, of course, for being here. i also want to thank s.p.u.r. again for hosting it. you know, when i started working with s.p.u.r. many years ago, i knew they were a spacey pe
different. putting the moral outrage aside for a second, this situation also puts cities at great risk. we've only gotten a taste of the destruction that -- disruption as possible with the numerous revolutions that broke out. the crisis will land hardest in cities. i see city's borrowing language from complexity theory, i see the boys and a critical state. it is a new situation. 50% of global population is urban, young, and connected by mobile phones. the young are the hardest hit here. in spain, the unemployment rate for young adults is around 50%. in the united states, college graduates are leaving school with an average of $24,000 in student loan debt into labor market for their age group that has not been as bad as it is today since the depression or the 1940's. the smallest thing can trigger a crisis now. it is a powder keg. on the other hand, along with this crisis is a powerful new set of tools that have arrived so breakthrough is also possible. we have a decision to make. let me talk about the sharing economy and how it plays into this. we define it broadly. we see it as a shift fr
was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the watershed. in developed areas, concrete and other impervious services prevent water from naturally soaking into the land. as the rainwater moves over the roads and concrete expanse, it captures trash and invisible chemicals, sending them straight to the nearest waterway -- untreated. when engineers first designed america's water infrast
other cities are watching san francisco. what we do here will influence them, and that could change the world. there are a lot of questions, too. the sharing economy waits to be shaped by policy. it is in its adolescence. this is a transformative moment. it is waiting to be shaped by policy, but for whose benefit? we believe it should be shaped for the benefit of as many people as possible, and especially for those who need it the most. . we also need new regulations, not simply application of the old. otherwise, the sharing economy will fail to meet its promises. 30 of things that are the biggest threats to our society. i will open a panel -- there are two things i think are the biggest threats to our society. i will give you a high level brief of the sharing economy. there is no textbook definition of the sharing economy. we will then begin the panel discussion which will last for 45 minutes or an hour, however long you want it to last. before i dived in here, raise your hand if you are familiar with at least one of these books. i highly recommend all of them. the one on the end i
we need them in the city at 2:00 a.m.. from the entertainment commission side and a lot -- mayor's office, if i could grab his attention, this is a longstanding issue that is very important. >> of the next question is written in red ink, on pink paper. to the police, what is the official stand, or your opinion, on the expansion of last fall to 4:00 a.m. ? >> i will feel that one. it is not a case by case basis. we have to take into consideration, if you're going to have last call before 4:00 in the morning, the impact it will have on community and traffic, the impact it will have on the people outside the venue, it has been case by case. i know that just about every venue once and after hours permit. we are trying to allow those as much as we can. we have been permitting them. however, with the stipulation to come back in six months 12 months to reevaluate. we are trying to keep those down to two days, three days per month. i know that they can get to that. it is just a matter of the impact that will be had on the community as a whole. it is not something we have had ever. wax je
mayor of the great city of san francisco mayor ed lee. >> audience: let's go giants! let's go giants. >> let's go giants. wow how thrilled we're are to have the world series champions back in san francisco. what a year it has been. it's been the year of the orange dragon. yeah! . orange october. but you know we have celebrated, we have screamed, we have shouted all year long and once again the giants have captured our imagination and team work and they did the hard work. often we look at sports and we have super stars and we have super stars but there is a motto on the clubhouse wall and it says "25 guys, one common goal, win today". [cheers and applause] and they certainly live up to this motto. when i see young people, all of the city supporting giants gear it's about the impact of this team. it is hard work, perseverance and hard work and work with each other. did bruce bochy and these 25 guys quick when they lost the first two games against cincinnati? no. did they accept the inevitable with st. louis? no. they carried on with determination and experts and pundits pr
. you know who you are. if i can give more to the city, i will. thank you. [applause] >> they have extra photographers that travel with them. let's hear it one more time for jocelyn and her family. thank you very much. [applause] >> i graduated from the university of california berkeley with a degree in civil engineering. i started with the department of public works in 1984. in 2003, i was asked to come to san francisco public utilities commission to take the meat on the program. i'm responsible for all the large capital projects for water, waste water, and power. it's about $12 billion of capital projects. we have a lot of projects. our water system improvement program, 80 products that span seven counties. we have a staff of about 400 city employees and about 500 consultants. puc is really embracing technology. we wanted to make sure we really had a system that would elevate all issues so we could address them in a timely manner. as you know, time is money. we have a construction management information system. it is a great tool to help us address construction and make it successful,
, but it's not going to work and today i will settle formality city librarian luis herr ra and i would like to welcome each and every one of you to our ceremony today. this is indeed a milestone because it's not only the beginning of construction to a new new library, but it's the end of the program, which means it's a long time coming. {$}[ applause ], what it means that this is the last project and i want to especially thank. north beach community for your patience, for your persistence and your perseverance to have the state-of-the-art library here in your neighborhood. [ applause ] thank you so much very much. [ applause ] >> let's talk a little bit about this library. it's going to be 60% larger than the other library that sits over there. 60% larger. that means more books, more media, wonderful technology, wi-fi access. if you envision this space and if you look that way you have a wonderful adult area. as you walk in from the mason street side, you have an amazing teen center for all the young adults. absolutely. yelling back here, [ applause ] . that was our deputy city librarian,
advocates, our library advocates and of course our city staff. we have a lot of acronyms, dpw, ruark, our mayor, planning, thank all for what you have done. [ applause ] . let me just close by saying that our work is not done. and if you remember we had opponents who fought this library. who delayed our being here by years, by millions of dollars and by lawsuits. is some of them may be running to be supervisor of district 3. and some of them are opposing proposition b. boo. >> boo. >> they are fighting our kids. they are fighting our families and they are fighting the next generations, but shame on them. that is right. so let me just say we have done a lot of chants in san francisco like let's go giants. i have another one for you, let's go prop b, let's go joe d. are you ready, kids? let's go probb, let's go joe d. let's go prop b, let's go joe d. thank you so much. [ applause ] >> all right, is there high-energy today? fantastic. a couple of other colleagues, peers in the city family, tom, who is our arts commission executive director. thank you for joining us. we have a partner
as well. you know, there are many streets of our great, great city and everybody i think is now enjoying so many of the neighborhoods that are rising up. but there have been neighborhoods like desoma and the excelsior, critical names of streets that we named after filipinos who really served our city and country in a fabulous way. i want to make sure that people remember that. because it's part of our history. so let me say some of them that many of you in the room know, but a lot of our people don't know that. you ever see the names? (listing names ) if you were really smart and if you are as smart as hydra wants everybody to be in san francisco, because of her board of education work, you should know victoria manalo dreys park. that was named after vicky dreyes, a filipino olympian from san francisco. these are names we should never forget. we'll see another names as they serve our great city and become our great local heroes. many of these names now on this very wonderful interactive board. tonight celebrate. celebrate the whole month and make sure we remember our heroes and make sur
years on the list. thank you. >> good evening honorable commissioners. i have been living in the city for 29 years driving a car for almost 24 years on the medallion waiting list for almost 14 years. yeah, i said it. okay. can i start over again? >> state your name. >> okay. good evening honorable commissioners. i have been living in the city for 29 years, driving a car for 24 years. on the medallion waitings list for 14 years and i am maline m alick. we have been good afternoon the right of appeal. this is the process. if you don't the city attorney says -- all due respect to the city attorney, the board can hold appeal of the individual permits but not the number of the permits. if you think about it when you get the number of permits to the taxi companies that is the denial of the original permits because all the medallions under the prop k system should have gone to the waiting list to be earned and it's the denial of the individual permits and the board should hear the appeal. we are not -- [inaudible] so we should have the right to appeal. please don't take the right aw
with the child support cases. so, these are very sobering challenges that we have as a city and county of san francisco. and, so, it is within this context that the d.a. and the commission on the status of women went to and proceeded to get a grant application with our department of justice. and i will first and foremost thank president obama and the department of justice for recognizing a big gap that we have, a gap that is reflective of our multi-culturalism. and, therefore, this specific $650,000 grant is really to fulfill a huge gap that we had when we are looking at immigrant families. we're looking at particularly latino and asian families, but immigrant families who, for many years, we knew that we were not getting the right level of reports, the right level of services because of the cultural gaps here. so, this is targeted and aimed at that gap. and it is, i think, very telling that we have our immigrant families stepping up and feeling confident in this city that they can work with all the community agencies that are involved here, and really try to help us end domestic violence bec
and trends that encourage and support the work that i have done for the last eight years for the city and county of san francisco. the next person i must recognize is rhonda simpsons and the work force director. she has taught me a lot in the last six years and grateful for her leadership especially when it comes to encouraging up and coming women in politics. and i thank the others for the invite and wisdom they have shown me along the way. in closing i look forward to continuing the work i have been doing in the neighborhoods and the communities to partner with each and every person that is committed to making san francisco a stellar place to live work and visit. together we can make a difference one issue at a time. thank you. [applause] >> in the house. >> that's not all. we have a very special person i had the privilege of working with on a daily basis and the one thing mr. mayor i won't be able to work with her. i would like to invite up mayor's lee director of violence prevention services and make the introduction to you. [applause] >> good evening. how are we? my name
of the other cities that have gone through this, their rates have gone up significantly. the federal government provides a number of grant programs but the bottom line is, you know, it's not enough. there's a massive need of money out there for wastewater and water infrastructure improvements around the country. narrator: the struggle for funds is as great in small towns as it is in metropolitan areas. oberstar: the federal government has let down municipalities. the first investment under the '72 clean water act was to deal with the biggest waste streams. and after a period of six or seven years, to then go to municipalities under 250,000 population. but that was just about the time when the federal government converted to a loan program. so smaller-sized communities have had to deal with repayable loans. a larger cost on a smaller tax base, and, arguably, less affluent communities. man: sewickley township is a rural farming community, however, herminie itself would be considered to be the downtown area of the township. it's the agways, the auto-parts store, the bank. it's your typical small-t
. >> president torres: okay. have any further comments? no? motion to assert city attorney privilege as requested. >> so moved. >> second. >> president torres: we're going to move all those in favor signify by saying aye. >> ayes. >> president torres: motion carries. let's move into closed session. >.any public comment before we o into closed session? >> i think she has to read. >> the clerk: closed session item 20, anticipated litigation as defendant, item 21, anticipated litigation as plaintiff. >> president torres: no public comments on this? all right. are you ready? i know we have to wait. i want to make sure you're ready once we've closed the doors. >> the public utilities commission meeting is in closed session ( pngetsd anything else we need? we're back on? all right. first of all, the meeting for tuesday, november 27, has been -- according to the comments here, canceled, and i think we have a report from the closed session is that correct? you give that report or do i? >> i believe you just noticed that there was no action. >> president torres: there was no action taken during the closed
avenue is more than just a 13-story building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pr
's what we're going to ask this challenge to present for our next improve sf challenge for the city. and that's what we'd like to engage people in. and then hopefully, some time after this challenge is announced, and if we can get the best ideas out there, we will be engaged with you to select the best answer. and if there's an idea out there that can answer that question about how to inspire people, then hopefully wq can go into november a hack-athon sponsored by green biz and others to develop an app that everyone can use. that's a great challenge. that's going to be so worthy of contributing to a goal that we've had about reducing our carbon footprint as a city. it's not just the households. once we get that data out we could look at the data from a community.re level and look at e data from a citywide level to see what we can do. i'm encouraged by that. i didn't want to give my data up to pg&e for various reasons. now iú] want to give it up for this challenge because i know people will be creative in having thisçe challenge to be something positive for the city. i wanted to an
lovers which there are countless many in the city and having an area where the dogs can play with their guardians and having a natural place for this to happen. you see all of the elements happening here and i want to thank the team and the agencies working together and with community and ledge and the department of the environment is here as well (railroad noise). >> yes and all positive activities. the railway station is historic and it will remain that way, so again welcome to heron's head park. by the way for those of you who don't know why it's named this way is because if you ever have a chance to get above this area and see it literally is shaped like a heron's head and this is part of the honoring of our waterfront area. it's a great investment and of course it will lead me to say with the responsible, and this year is our proposition b which extends another great investment of $195 million to many other areas including the south east sector of open space that we got to take care of, and modernize. this is what rec and park does very well with dpw with all of the
afternoon everyone. welcome to city hall. it's my honor and pleasure to welcome all of you here on this reflection and celebration event, and just wanted to make sure you knew that when we were talking about this with abbey shortly after milton's passing away we thought it was a great opportunity for those that knew milton, knew his personality and engaged himself with him and his family over the many years want i find it appropriate of the families -- i am thankful abbey you and the kids agreed this is appropriate for milton and for our memories. i want to express not only our heart felt appreciation for milton's work and our sadness of losing him, but there's so many things in his life to celebrate, and i know milton way back when i started working in the city, and he came forth and said "by the way -- introduced himself as the son and carolene and the senior marks and said "we have something in common" and" what's that?" and we both went to bowdoin college and we are boft west coast guys and had friends and how did we end up at bowdoin college in maine and as we shared the
was down to 8.6% from 9.5%. total wages earned city-wide were up 8% to 45 billion. this construction spending or cost estimate number was at 3.4 billion, which is up 52% over the year previously. taxable sales was up. city revenue was up a little. and city expenditures were flat from the previous year, which is a good thing and they're less than revenues. in terms of a sneak peek of 2012, looks like recovery is continuing. we've got a nonseasonally adjusted unemployment rate as of september 2012, it's down to 6.9% from annual average in 2011 of 8.6%. and we've got a gain of almost 10,000 jobs, up 2%, since the beginning of the year. this is employment development department data, their monthly labor force report release. and on that note, i conclude my briefing and entertain any questions or comments you might have. >> commissioner wu. >> i just wanted to ask on the point that you made that the data will be available electronically, that means sort of in its raw form for the public to use? >> exactly. >> i think it would be great at that time to have some sort of public training. my
city librarian, what can we say? a wonderful space for children. this north beach library serves over 30,000 diverse residents and it's way overdue to have a state-of-the-art library. clean it's really a true partnership with our city departments and i want to thank our dpw folks and their team. mindy, lena, fantastic work in managing this project. [ applause ] and another superb partner in phil ginsburg, rec and park, thank you. [ applause ] this is going to be an amazing space that ties together the joe dimaggio park and you will hear more about that. it's wonderful to know that it really creates an amazing civic space for north beach and it wouldn't happen wouldn't fantastic support from the community. julie christinsen, a shout out to you. [ applause ] the. so throughout this ceremony, we're going to celebrate and pay tribute to all of the wonderful folks that are making it happen. so without further ado, person that not only has prior director of public works, city administrator and now wonderful mayor for our city; who has been terrifically supportive of our city, mayor ed le
that are on these jobs are from the city and city and county of san francisco. he says to me, well, espinola, all i do is put on my hard hat and i go on a job site. * i said, yes, look who you are. you're the money man. so, you can do what you please. but you don't write reports to the state about the contractors and whether or not they are abiding by the law. and he looked at me. he said, i never thought about that. and, you know, it hurts me for the last 50 years dealing with human rights is that their wings have been clipped in order not to make sure that residents of san francisco are included. and you'll need to check just to see how many of these do we have in the city and how many of them are of color and how many of them actually get contracts to do construction work here in san francisco. it's sad, because we know for a fact if a contractor lives in this city, he's going to hire people from the community and from the city and county of san francisco. so, when mr. dee costa speak, he's speaking of what we see and have been seeing over the years. and there needs to be some corrections. so, i do
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